Planning Your Career

The following resources provide a good overview of the career planning process, but remember

  1. Explore your interests, aptitudes and abilities (personal knowledge)
  2. Identify careers that are a good match for you (interest inventories).
  3. Explore suitable careers (specific careers and career databases).

Personality Fit

People who are happy in their careers are usually people who are a “good-fit” for those careers. The following resources will allow you to explore various aspect of your personality and help you acquire the knowledge and vocabulary to describe your interests and values.

  • Building a Personal and Career Portfolio guides teachers and students in planning and preparing individual portfolios.
  • Career Cruising has a Career Portfolio section that allows you to create a password protected portfolio to store your Career Matchmaker or Career Selector results and to keep notes on careers and schools that interest you. You will need to logon to the Career Cruising site using the Username and Password that have been assigned to your school.
    If you do not have a username and password, please see your Guidance Counsellor. Once you have logged onto the Career Cruising site select Portfolio (at the top of the page). Once you have logged onto the Career Cruising site select Portfolio (at the top of the page).
  • The JobsEtc website that has a number of iQuizzes that will help you to learn how to describe yourself.  You should register for the site so that you can save the results of the online quizzes.
  • With the help of the Canadian Mental Health Association’s Mental Health Meter, you can reflect on your unique strengths and identify areas where your level of mental fitness could be improved to help you cope with all of life’s up and downs.  Assessing our mental health is not as simple to do as measuring our physical health.  There are no scales or endurance tests that rate mental fitness.
  • Resiliency is the ability to spring back from and successfully adapt to adversity. An increasing body of research from the fields of psychology, psychiatry, and sociology is showing that most people, including young people, can bounce back from risks, stress, crises, and trauma and experience life success.
  • The Government of Canada Youth website has six quizzes to prepare you for seeking employment.  If you are having trouble with the flash-version of the site, try the low-tech text version.

Interest Inventories

Interest inventories are questionnaires that are designed to help you to find the careers that match your interests and abilities.

  • Career Cruising has a Career Matchmaker section (a sophisticated interest inventory)  and a Career Selector section that will help you find careers that might be of interest to you. You will need to logon to the Career Cruising site using the Username and Password that have been assigned to your school. Once you have logged onto the Career Cruising site select Career Matchmaker or Explore Careers.
  • The Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Job Futures Interest Quiz has a simple 24 question quiz that will assist you in determining your areas of interest by helping you identify the degree to which you enjoy working with data/information, people or things. At the end of the quiz, you will generate a list of occupations that match your results.
  • Toronto Public Library now has a virtual reference library. One portion of the site is called Career Bookmarks. It contains excellent resources on career strategies, self-assessment tools, career choices, marketing yourself, jobs and success on the job.

Career Databases

Career databases contain detailed information on a wide selection of careers.

  • Career Cruising has an Explore Careers section that allows you to quickly access information on a wide variety of careers.
  • Working in Canada is a Human Resources Development Canada (HRSDC) site that contains information for most careers.
  • My Blueprint Education Planner has a Program Finder tool that allows you to search the school-to-work opportunities database with or without completing the High School Planner.  Enter School-to-Work Opportunities in the Show Me box and Ontario in the Province box.
  • Ontario Job Futures is a publication which provides information on the current trends and future outlook for 157 occupations common to Ontario.  It is a joint effort of the Province of Ontario and the Government of Canada.
  • The Alliance of Sector Councils (TASC) is a coordinating body formed of some 26 sector councils and industrial associations.
  • Workapedia is a one stop shop to access career-related resources from Canada’s industry sectors.
  • VECTOR (Video Exploration of Careers, Transitions,Opportunities, and Realities) is a career exploration and planning tool. If you will register as a “New User” you can create a personal toolkit (storage space) to save resources for quick reference at a later date.
  • The Work Destinations website is a comprehensive source of information on regulated trades and professions in Canada.  It contains information on entry requirements in both official languages and is the only site designed primarily for professional or trades people moving within Canada.  It also provides information for persons considering immigration to Canada. then click on the career of your choice to see the entry requirements for Ontario or any of the other regions of Canada

Job Search Skills

Job search skills are the tools that you need to get the attention of a potential employer.  If you can show potential employers that you have what they are looking for, you’ll increase your chances of being short-listed for an interview.
There are several websites that will give you a good overview of the complete package of job search skills.

Job Banks

The following government websites provide you with information related to job opportunities, there are many other resources available on the web.

Last Modified: May 20, 2011